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  • Okay, I have a question for you guys. Is it confirmed that gynophobia is a theme in Silent Hill? I don't mean hatred against women  - I've heard that argument many times and I can conclusively say Silent Hill devs don't hate women, just like they don't hate religion. But I mean like... fear of vaginas. Because every time I visit a monster page on this wiki and something has a vertical mouth with teeth, vagina dentata is brought up. Okay, not every time, but enough where it's kinda bugging me. Especially in Homecoming. I'm not denying that Alex Shepherd has some repressed sexuality issues, especially due to what's in his diary, and I'd like to think he's a closeted bi/pan or something because queer characters in Silent Hill would be cool to have. But I don't think he's afraid of vaginas. If anything, he may have the oppisite issue - he likes them too much. So what am I missing here? I've been on almost every Silent Hill fan website and the official sites, and I've read most of the little game extras. Did I miss something? Or is gynophobia really that big of a theme and I'm just oblivious? Or is one of the editors way too into Freudian Psychology? What do you guys think?

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    • I've never really given these monsters much thought, because they seem to have the same message for me. I don't think its because Alex is afraid of vaginas, it's because of his split personality. Like the schism, it symbolizes how he thinks he will save josh, but in another side he knows he will never be able to bring him back. But hey, I could be wrong, who knows

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    • I think the prevalence of gynophobia on the wiki is due to an editor’s overzealousness and is not as big of a theme in Silent Hill as they thought.


      What I see in the series is sexual frustration and anxiety with the focus tending to be on females for various reasons. For example James, for obvious reasons had this; Heather, from my view, had anxieties concerning pregnancy which made the focus more on females, but not exclusively (split worm, possibly) and I think she also had anxieties concerning sexuality as many teens (and plenty of adults) do; for Alex, I saw some sexual frustration, but I didn't really see much gynophobia. I think his issues were anger at his parents and guilt, with pregnancy (not gynophobia) being a recurring theme.


      I agree with you on the hatred against women: At least Team Silent didn't have this. Just look at Heather Mason for proof. She's a fantastic female character because she's treated as a person, not a WOMAN. As are, in my opinion, the other female characters of Team Silent. Speaking of which, anyone else have an issue with Elle? In my view, she was a rather helpless and inconsequential character.

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    • I would agree with you guys - I didn't see it either. And I don't view Elle as helpless, but perhaps inconsequential.

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    • Sorry for going off topic, and correct me if I'm wrong on anything: Elle gets attacked by a Siam - she does nothing and the player has to save her.

      In the sewers, even though Alex has plenty of weapons, she is left with none and the player has to protect her. She then disappears and Alex is worried that she's in trouble. In Silent Hill 4, Eileen was severely injured and she still got a weapon and was able to help defend herself.

      Then on the boat ride, she gets kidnapped and Alex is unsuccessful in trying to save her.

      Then in the lair, Alex saves her from Curtis.

      From what I remember, the most she does in the game is open gates and hang up posters.

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    • Well we've already seen female characters being able to hold their own against the monsters of silent hill (heather, Cybil, etc). So I'm guessing they made Elle weak because it wouldn't really fit her character. She's made to be a frantic character, so I would imagine giving her a shotgun wouldn't help much.

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    • Since the majority of main characters in Silent Hill franchise are men, it could be that the "gynophobia" that is being shown in the games represent the fact that men have higher status in the society than women, and therefore the women are likely being put in as "damsels in distress", excluding Cybil and Heather

      This theme isn't the common thing you'd see in many video games. That AND broken families thingy.

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    • Hmm... I don't think so, but maybe. The thing is, weak women are okay - I, myself, am a so called "weak person". It's on whether or not you make all of your women weak. There are many strong women in Silent Hill, so it's not stereotyping. It's showing the reality that sometimes, some people need help. Elle isn't weak emotionally, though, even if she is physically. Her diary shows she will brave the fog world monsters if needed, and she didn't give up on her sister. That's a strong person.

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    • She isn't weak emotionally, she just doesn't have the right mindset for taking on a monster. For example, she is first seen posting missing pepople's papers on a board. But eventually in the sewers she just admits they will never find them. I'm guessing she would just give up eventually when facing things alone.

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    • VenT-rexBrennenburg:

      I have to disagree, I don't think the "gynophobia" reflects a higher status. First of all, I don't believe that the game developers would consciously or unconsciously include gynophobic imagery because of the higher statuses that many males tend to enjoy in the real world. Second, within the game world, it wouldn't make sense that it would be reflected in the Silent Hill monsters; I don't think the men of Silent Hill wouldn't have serious issues concerning this.

      Furthermore, in the Silent Hill universe, women have held many positions of power. Dahlia was able to manipulate Harry throughout much of the first game and Kaufmann was thoroughly hesitant in confronting her. Claudia was not only the major driving force of the events of the third game, but Vincent deliberately chose not to confront her directly. Despite her serious injuries, Eileen consistently sought to comfort and protect the young Walter Sullivan… And so forth.

      MeganeEarthmate:

      Yeah, I think you’re right. I know personally I just get very up-in-arms about the portrayal of women in video games because I think there’s far too many cases of stereotyping both men and women. And I suppose she does show some strength: As you said, she didn’t give up on her sister and she also didn’t join the Order despite the consequences.

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    • Well the silent hill franchise has never really stereotyped women, it's just that some women have been proven to have a weaker stature.

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    • Maurbeus: Yeah, no matter the gender, I hate stereotyping. But the thing is, there's nothing wrong with being weak, even if you're a woman. A lot of so-called "feminists" will bash any woman character who has a weakness, or is just softer than others, which sends a message to the irl soft/shy/fragile women that they are bad, and they are the reason stereotyping exists. I felt really guilty about that for a long time. I know that isn't your intent, and if all women are shown as fragile, then yeah, it's really bad! But one not-as-physically-strong woman is a good thing, I think. Variety in characters is important! Imagine if all the male characters in Silent Hill were all super buff and tough. Or, on the other end, super shy and not physically strong at all. That wouldn't make for a very good game.

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    • The silent hill franchise has never really stereotyped men either. Sure some might be physically strong (Alex in this case), they aren't the manliest people in earth. They vary in emotional and physical depth, but in the end they're all just trying to escape silent hill, or face up to their demons

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    • I agree... one of the reasons I love Silent Hill is it's unique characters. Like James Sunderland. What other game allows me to play as a 29 year old depressed store clerk and makes it enjoyable?

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    • Good point, I always found James to be one of my favorite video game characters.

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    • Pardon me, but based on my research and views, I find it a little disturbing to see that there are four female antagonists, while only three male antagonists present. They are Dahlia Gillespie, Claudia Wolf, Margaret Holloway, and Maria.

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    • 4 and 3 are pretty close.... and can we really count Maria as an antagonist? She's a manifestation.

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    • I mean I totally get it, VenT-rexBrennenburgbut while playing Born from a Wish, it's kinda obvious that Maria doesn't want to play the "bad guy". She's doing what she was created to do.

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    • It's never really bothered me nor have I heard it bothering someone else that there is one more female antagonist than a male antagonist. I think your just overthinking it

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    • It depends on the situation, I think. I know many medias that stereotype women in power as "evil matriarchs". Silent Hill doesn't, though. I think it's because the Order's "god" is female, the leaders are female too. And, if we're honest, while the main antagonists might be women more often, I think there are more men who are just general buttfaces. Thomas Orosco, Micheal Kaufmann, Leonard Wolf, Vincent Smith, Richard Braintree, Patrick Napier, Adam Shepherd... All major buttfaces, imo. I guess Adam is at least somewhat sympathetic, though. I can't really sense any sexism in the series (outside of the characters' own sexism), and I'm usually good at that.

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    • That.was.epic

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    • MeganeEarthmate wrote:
      4 and 3 are pretty close.... and can we really count Maria as an antagonist? She's a manifestation.

      I'm not referring to any antagonistic behavior Maria may have shown, just her position as the "antagonist" of the story.

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    • VenT-rexBrennenburg wrote:
      MeganeEarthmate wrote:
      4 and 3 are pretty close.... and can we really count Maria as an antagonist? She's a manifestation.
      I'm not referring to any antagonistic behavior Maria may have shown, just her position as the "antagonist" of the story.

      Isn't Silent Hill and James himself the real antagonists? From my view, Maria is never a true antagonist to James. She helps at some points and never really opposes him, gives him trouble, but never opposes.

      MeganeEarthmate:

      That "Fresh Prince of Silent Hill" was awesome.

      Also I agree with all of your previous post except: What's wrong with Vincent Smith? I though he was great, even though he was very self-interested and I would never trust him. I guess he's never all that nice, but he's still not that bad; just self-interested.

      Also in reference to previous discussions:

      I agree with many of you. One of the greatest things about the SIlent Hill series is that they create great, well rounded characters and you can't create a great character when you simply rely on stereotypes.

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    • From what I've gathered James is the real antagonist, also that Fresh Prince of Silent Hill totally needs to be read by Harry's original voice actor.

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    • Cody7412 wrote:
      From what I've gathered James is the real antagonist, also that Fresh Prince of Silent Hill totally needs to be read by Harry's original voice actor.

      Why don't we add it to James' page?

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    • added it to James' page

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    • The antagonst can't be the protagonist. The protagonist is the main character of the story, the antagonist is the primary opposition of the protagonist. 

      There's a common misconception that the hero is always the antagonist which isn't true, Walter Walt is a pretty popular subject of an "evil" protagonist, anyone who's watched Breaking Bad is aware that his initial intent for his use of creating meth was to financially support his family but eventually just did it for the hell of it. Look at any of the GTA protagonists, they're criminals and the like with very little heroic qualities.

      The same's for the antagonist, the antagonist can (rarely but can be) the hero, in Goodfellas, the police are treated as the antagonist despite them only doing their job.

      While Maria does assist James in certain segments, yes. Don't forget as well, she's trying to force James to ignore Mary completely and accept her instead, she even goes to the lengths of killing him if he moves on and realises what he did and doesn't ultimately take the selfish path of just accepting Maria, almost like she's trying to trap him in his past so James' journey to Silent Hill would have been pointless makes it arguable of Maria's status as an antagonist.

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    • True, althought I think James creates the problems for himself thus making him an antagonist

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    • James creating the problems for himself doesn't really label him as the antagonist you could say he's the catalyst sure, if the game played from say...Eddie's point of view, James would logically be an antagonist if the circumstances changed of James attempting to kill Eddie for something instead of the opposite.

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    • James is a "debatable" antagonist - see "external conflict" vs "internal conflict".

      The protagonists are their own "opposing force" in a way, sure, but the category is meant for the external conflicts - the villains and characters who definitely "oppose" the protagonist.

      EVERYONE makes mistakes and problems, it's part of nature, I guess. But making arguably "immoral" choices doesn't automatically make a character an antagonist. There are likely players out there who think Mary's suffocation was justified because she was terminally ill, and she was lashing out at James.

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    • The majority of main character in Silent Hill series had their respective bad deeds which may make them look like antagonists, in one way or another.

      James - he murdered Mary because he can't bear to watch Mary suffer, or that he was so frustrated that he didn't know what else to do.

      Alex - more like an accidental killer unlike James. His brother's death scarred him so much that Alex would rather lie to himself than to accept the truth, just like James.

      Murphy - a "real" criminal who has a possible chance of redemption, if only he had his chance.

      Travis - sometimes one won't be able to escape his past as long as he continues to reject it. Only by "walking the path of redemption" can he start anew.

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    • I wasn't saying that James is his own antagonist because he did bad things, I said it because he's the root of everything he has to fight (with the help of Silent Hill).

      Maria is a (at least partial) manifestation coming from James subconscious. The Red Pyramid: Same thing, a manifestation to punish him. All the monsters, etc… Almost everything in the game that opposes James is there either because James caused it or manifested it (again, with Silent Hill).

      You made a good point Riley, Maria is trying to make him forget about Mary, but again isn’t that due to him partially wanting to forget? Maria certainly helps lead him into forgetting, but I don’t think she does that on account of her own self. I think it’s the manifested part that compels her to do so.

      I see the biggest conflict of the game to be James’s struggle with accepting what he had done and moving on from the loss of Mary:

      In the “Rebirth” ending, he didn’t accept his decision and he couldn’t move on. He clung onto the hope of simply fixing things and getting her back. In the “In Water” ending, he was able to accept what he had done, but he couldn’t move on. In the “Maria” ending, he never accepted the reality of his choice, but he moved on regardless; thus he was doomed to repeat his actions. The “best” ending, the “Leave” ending: He both accepted and moved on. He found closure and a reason to continue.

      I would say that the best ending is the (though unknown) goal for James the protagonist. The only thing stopping him from both accepting and moving on, is himself. The town's manifestations are standing in the way of his known goal of finding Mary. Thusly I see James, with the help of the town, as the antogonist.

      Also: "The antagonst can't be the protagonist." Who's the antagonist in Fight Club?

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    • Maurbeus wrote:

      I wasn't saying that James is his own antagonist because he did bad things, I said it because he's the root of everything he has to fight (with the help of Silent Hill).

      Maria is a (at least partial) manifestation coming from James subconscious. The Red Pyramid: Same thing, a manifestation to punish him. All the monsters, etc… Almost everything in the game that opposes James is there either because James caused it or manifested it (again, with Silent Hill).

      You made a good point Riley, Maria is trying to make him forget about Mary, but again isn’t that due to him partially wanting to forget? Maria certainly helps lead him into forgetting, but I don’t think she does that on account of her own self. I think it’s the manifested part that compels her to do so.

      I see the biggest conflict of the game to be James’s struggle with accepting what he had done and moving on from the loss of Mary:

      In the “Rebirth” ending, he didn’t accept his decision and he couldn’t move on. He clung onto the hope of simply fixing things and getting her back. In the “In Water” ending, he was able to accept what he had done, but he couldn’t move on. In the “Maria” ending, he never accepted the reality of his choice, but he moved on regardless; thus he was doomed to repeat his actions. The “best” ending, the “Leave” ending: He both accepted and moved on. He found closure and a reason to continue.

      I would say that the best ending is the (though unknown) goal for James the protagonist. The only thing stopping him from both accepting and moving on, is himself. The town's manifestations are standing in the way of his known goal of finding Mary. Thusly I see James, with the help of the town, as the antogonist.

      Also: "The antagonst can't be the protagonist." Who's the antagonist in Fight Club?

      You definatly worded that better than I could

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    • This conversation became a lot cooler than I expected.

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    • Maurbeus wrote:

      I wasn't saying that James is his own antagonist because he did bad things, I said it because he's the root of everything he has to fight (with the help of Silent Hill).

      Maria is a (at least partial) manifestation coming from James subconscious. The Red Pyramid: Same thing, a manifestation to punish him. All the monsters, etc… Almost everything in the game that opposes James is there either because James caused it or manifested it (again, with Silent Hill).

      You made a good point Riley, Maria is trying to make him forget about Mary, but again isn’t that due to him partially wanting to forget? Maria certainly helps lead him into forgetting, but I don’t think she does that on account of her own self. I think it’s the manifested part that compels her to do so.

      I see the biggest conflict of the game to be James’s struggle with accepting what he had done and moving on from the loss of Mary:

      In the “Rebirth” ending, he didn’t accept his decision and he couldn’t move on. He clung onto the hope of simply fixing things and getting her back. In the “In Water” ending, he was able to accept what he had done, but he couldn’t move on. In the “Maria” ending, he never accepted the reality of his choice, but he moved on regardless; thus he was doomed to repeat his actions. The “best” ending, the “Leave” ending: He both accepted and moved on. He found closure and a reason to continue.

      I would say that the best ending is the (though unknown) goal for James the protagonist. The only thing stopping him from both accepting and moving on, is himself. The town's manifestations are standing in the way of his known goal of finding Mary. Thusly I see James, with the help of the town, as the antogonist.

      Also: "The antagonst can't be the protagonist." Who's the antagonist in Fight Club?

      Arguably Tyler Durdan, I'm aware of the clusterfuck of the plot. Which makes the idea of the antagonist an interesting topic, because of the protagonist's mental state you would be able to argue that it's Durdan. It's kinda like Manhunt 2, even though obviously FC came out before. The idea of Leo and Daniel has a similar vibe what kinda makes it hard to label the antagonist because technically it's the same person but a different mind at the time.

      What I meant by Maria is mostly that she's literally force feeding him herself, yes James sub conciously created Maria because of how Mary lacked certain things James wanted, but practically forcing him to pretty much forget she ever existed and just take her instead seems pretty self willed and rather selfish even if it's what James wanted from Mary, I mean I'd be more indifferent if she didn't try to kill James if he's accepted that Mary's dead and he can't replace her. 

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    • Then to put it in another word, Maria and all the monsters James battled through his way are....... Shadows born from James' negative thoughts? (Remind me with the Shadow & Persona concepts?)

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    • Riley Heligo wrote:
      Maurbeus wrote:
      -snip-
      -snip-

      What I meant by Maria is mostly that she's literally force feeding him herself, yes James sub conciously created Maria because of how Mary lacked certain things James wanted, but practically forcing him to pretty much forget she ever existed and just take her instead seems pretty self willed and rather selfish even if it's what James wanted from Mary, I mean I'd be more indifferent if she didn't try to kill James if he's accepted that Mary's dead and he can't replace her. 

      I think this is what it comes down to: Was it “Maria” who was pushing him into forgetting about Mary and moving on with Maria or was it James’ own feelings being reflected back at himself? (My argument will assume the image in the mirror is still “you”; I am being largely metaphorical here)

      I believe that it was not “Maria”. If I’m remembering correctly, the times she’s most aggressive are also the times she shows knowledge that isn’t possible for her to know without her being a manifestation(in the labyrinth while she was in the jail cell for example). This suggests that it is not “Mary” who is doing this, but instead it is James’ subconscious being revealed through Silent Hill. Also, during these times she pushes him to other things as well; in the labyrinth she indicates he should find the videotape, which leads him to remembering (but not accepting) what he had done. In this case, I believe, it’s James’ own self being reflected back at himself

      Other times, she shows a general seductiveness which, as you stated, is Silent Hill showing what James’ subconscious wanted.

      The other things Maria does and the rare times she shows neither of these things, are what the real “Maria” is, assuming there actually is a real “Maria” and she is not a total manifestation. I believe there is a real “Maria” (someone who recently died or would die, someone who was remade by the Silent Hill; something, I don’t know….), but I couldn’t say for sure. The Born From a Wish add-on doesn’t really help, but it certainly further confirms that Maria is not solely her own entity.

      In the “Maria” ending, it’s Mary (or the memory of Mary) that tries to kill James. This part, to me, is a sign of his refusal to accept his actions and a need to move on/away from Mary/the memory of Mary, which is reaffirmed by his previous showings of care and attention for Maria(through the players actions, which "chooses" the ending); with Maria being an avenue for him to just forget and move on.

      So to me, Maria is not malicious on her own accord, it is James himself that causes this behavior.

      Ven T-rexBrennenburg: More or less. From my understanding, Silent Hill creates manifestations born from peoples’ subconscious minds. Remember Laura is an innocent and she doesn’t seem to ever be bothered by the monsters. That said, the nature of the town is enigmatic. Also: Maria is Born from a Wish =D.

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    • Maurbeus wrote:
      VenT-rexBrennenburg wrote:
      MeganeEarthmate wrote:
      4 and 3 are pretty close.... and can we really count Maria as an antagonist? She's a manifestation.
      I'm not referring to any antagonistic behavior Maria may have shown, just her position as the "antagonist" of the story.
      Isn't Silent Hill and James himself the real antagonists? From my view, Maria is never a true antagonist to James. She helps at some points and never really opposes him, gives him trouble, but never opposes.

      MeganeEarthmate:

      That "Fresh Prince of Silent Hill" was awesome.

      Also I agree with all of your previous post except: What's wrong with Vincent Smith? I though he was great, even though he was very self-interested and I would never trust him. I guess he's never all that nice, but he's still not that bad; just self-interested.

      Also in reference to previous discussions:

      I agree with many of you. One of the greatest things about the SIlent Hill series is that they create great, well rounded characters and you can't create a great character when you simply rely on stereotypes.

      To answer "what's wrong with Vincent": he's a selfish jerk. He's a jerk. Not as jerky as the other jerks but still a jerk. Also, he toys with Claudia by bringing up her father's abuse

      Claudia isn't much better, mind you, but at least she wanted to better the world, even if she did it by murder. While it is worse objectively than what Vincent did, her motivations are more likable. Vincent wants money and power.

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    • To answer "what's wrong with Vincent": he's a selfish jerk. He's a jerk. Not as jerky as the other jerks but still a jerk. Also, he toys with Claudia by bringing up her father's abuse

      Claudia isn't much better, mind you, but at least she wanted to better the world, even if she did it by murder. While it is worse objectively than what Vincent did, her motivations are more likable. Vincent wants money and power.

      That means both Claudia and Vincent are villains. Not just Claudia alone.

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    • MeganeEarthmate wrote:
      Maurbeus wrote:
      -snip-
      To answer "what's wrong with Vincent": he's a selfish jerk. He's a jerk. Not as jerky as the other jerks but still a jerk. Also, he toys with Claudia by bringing up her father's abuse

      Claudia isn't much better, mind you, but at least she wanted to better the world, even if she did it by murder. While it is worse objectively than what Vincent did, her motivations are more likable. Vincent wants money and power.

      Yeah... He is a bit - ok he's very manipulative... He had issues with the abuse too, though and I always saw him and Claudia as both antagonizing eachother and competing against eachother. I always felt it was just part of his.... Charm? Hahaha.

      Ok, he is a jerk, but not nearly as bad as the others. At least he doesn't actively seek to do harm.

      Hmmmm: Objectively she is worse due to her conviction, but Vincent may have been just as bad if he wasn't so cowardly. She's comes from a more sympathetic place, but he's more rational, even though it's due to self-preservation.

      Gah, I love all of those charactors in SH3.

      Ven T-rexBrennenburg: I don't think any of those character are truly evil. Claudia is certainly the antagonist; Vincent lies in a grey area. Doesn't mean he better than Claudia, but he isn't an antagonist to Heather, as he tries to use Heather in an attempt to usurp Claudia.

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    • On topic: Thought about this further and I really can't see any gynophobia beyond issues with his mother(although there’s also the same issues with his father). Outwardly, he very friendly to both Margaret and Elle Holloway. In my opinion absolutely no sign of fear of women in these interactions(unless being startled by Margaret counts as gynophobia).

      There's the nurses, which I see as the manifestation of sexual frustrations(note the fetuses which can be illuminated: goes along with the pregnancy theme). The creepy doll which he finds creepy(dolls are creepy). The bosses Scarlet and Asphyxia. Which A: Have appearances which are probably related to the childrens’ psyches and their demises, like the Sepulcher. And B: Were likely manifested for their killers and not Alex. Then there’s Amnion, which I feel is related to Joshua’s death being manifested with a strong theme of pregnancy. I don’t totally get this connection, but there is undeniably a strong theme of pregnancy in the game(as the older brother, Alex would have seen his mom pregnant and maybe this caused him to connect this with Joshua?). Also, if anything feminine, the needler has a theme of pregnancy and not womanhood in itself.

      In my opinion, the Schism is indeed representative of a split. Though I see little relationship with vaginal dentata; vaginas don’t look or open up like that. To me the teeth are just there to make it more menacing and is not indicative of a manifested thought.

      The Lurkers’ faces, on the other hand, does have this look. Although because I don’t see a supporting theme of gynophobia, I would chalk it up to sexual anxieties. Same as Split Worm with Heather Mason; it wasn’t (again, in my opinion) a fear of penises, it was partially a manifested anxiety concerning sexuality.

      I must say I’m not sure about the Siam and I don’t have an easy answer for the fleshy membranes Alex cuts through, though.

      Personally, I just don’t see it. Especially watching his interactions with any women other than his mom. Even his interactions with his mom isn't that bad and isn't all that fearful, seemed more like emotional distance and fear of the situation(she does act creepy). The only time I see him obviously fearing a woman is when Margaret is coming at him with a drill; I think most people would fear both a woman and a man in this situation.

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    • Maurbeus wrote:
      On topic: Thought about this further and I really can't see any gynophobia beyond issues with his mother(although there’s also the same issues with his father). Outwardly, he very friendly to both Margaret and Elle Holloway. In my opinion absolutely no sign of fear of women in these interactions(unless being startled by Margaret counts as gynophobia).

      There's the nurses, which I see as the manifestation of sexual frustrations(note the fetuses which can be illuminated: goes along with the pregnancy theme). The creepy doll which he finds creepy(dolls are creepy). The bosses Scarlet and Asphyxia. Which A: Have appearances which are probably related to the childrens’ psyches and their demises, like the Sepulcher. And B: Were likely manifested for their killers and not Alex. Then there’s Amnion, which I feel is related to Joshua’s death being manifested with a strong theme of pregnancy. I don’t totally get this connection, but there is undeniably a strong theme of pregnancy in the game(as the older brother, Alex would have seen his mom pregnant and maybe this caused him to connect this with Joshua?). Also, if anything feminine, the needler has a theme of pregnancy and not womanhood in itself.

      In my opinion, the Schism is indeed representative of a split. Though I see little relationship with vaginal dentata; vaginas don’t look or open up like that. To me the teeth are just there to make it more menacing and is not indicative of a manifested thought.

      The Lurkers’ faces, on the other hand, does have this look. Although because I don’t see a supporting theme of gynophobia, I would chalk it up to sexual anxieties. Same as Split Worm with Heather Mason; it wasn’t (again, in my opinion) a fear of penises, it was partially a manifested anxiety concerning sexuality.

      I must say I’m not sure about the Siam and I don’t have an easy answer for the fleshy membranes Alex cuts through, though.

      Personally, I just don’t see it. Especially watching his interactions with any women other than his mom. Even his interactions with his mom isn't that bad and isn't all that fearful, seemed more like emotional distance and fear of the situation(she does act creepy). The only time I see him obviously fearing a woman is when Margaret is coming at him with a drill; I think most people would fear both a woman and a man in this situation.

      I completely agree. It doesn't add up with his behavior.

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    • Maurbeus wrote:
      MeganeEarthmate wrote:
      Maurbeus wrote:
      -snip-
      To answer "what's wrong with Vincent": he's a selfish jerk. He's a jerk. Not as jerky as the other jerks but still a jerk. Also, he toys with Claudia by bringing up her father's abuse

      Claudia isn't much better, mind you, but at least she wanted to better the world, even if she did it by murder. While it is worse objectively than what Vincent did, her motivations are more likable. Vincent wants money and power.

      Yeah... He is a bit - ok he's very manipulative... He had issues with the abuse too, though and I always saw him and Claudia as both antagonizing eachother and competing against eachother. I always felt it was just part of his.... Charm? Hahaha.

      Ok, he is a jerk, but not nearly as bad as the others. At least he doesn't actively seek to do harm.

      Hmmmm: Objectively she is worse due to her conviction, but Vincent may have been just as bad if he wasn't so cowardly. She's comes from a more sympathetic place, but he's more rational, even though it's due to self-preservation.

      Gah, I love all of those charactors in SH3.

      Ven T-rexBrennenburg: I don't think any of those character are truly evil. Claudia is certainly the antagonist; Vincent lies in a grey area. Doesn't mean he better than Claudia, but he isn't an antagonist to Heather, as he tries to use Heather in an attempt to usurp Claudia.

      You know how Pokemon Villains have little sidekick Villains? Like Ghetsis has Colress? That's how I view Vincent. He acts like the Colress to Claudia's Ghetsis. Sort of helping her, sort of impeding her, doesn't care about the cause at all and is only there for his own benefit.

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    • It looks to me that the vagina issue here is more likely because the Shepherd are a very traditional family and the sexual topics are taboo, therefore Alex grew with the sexuality of the movies and mostly the war movies when the women are nurses like the case of Pearl harbor for example, or they are victims or damsel in distress, so he actually like women but he is more the male alpha situation going on. The vagina dentata on the game is more close to the conception rejection theme, that we even listen in the song "The theme of Alex", it looks to me that He wish he were never born at all, because even the dog Shuki was treat better than him, the vagina meaning in a traditional family about sex is for conception isn't for pleasure, but for a teenage like Alex sure he wants to bang Elle without that idea, so its the guilt from his thoughts about women, for his desire to them. 

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    • Riley Heligo
      Riley Heligo removed this reply because:
      15:38, August 12, 2017
      This reply has been removed
    • A FANDOM user
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